Point 2 View Super Tips: Prepping for Projection

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Filed Under (Document Cameras in Business, APPLICATION, All Applications, All Products, P2V, P2V Tips) by ipevoblog on 2011-01-24

This Super Tips entry is designed as a general guide to help you get the image from your Point 2 View USB Document Camera onto the projection screen. Unfortunately, given the huge amount of projector models, not to mention possible audiovisual configurations in your classroom or conference room, we’ll have to stay on a general level. Hopefully this guide will give you a good feel for what’s involved, and if you can’t quite get it working, you may need to tap your IT department or resident techie person for additional advice.

At its most basic, projecting onto a large screen takes three devices: computer or laptop (PC or Mac), the Point 2 View camera, and a projector. You can see the setup in the diagram below. The Point 2 View plugs into your computer via USB, and the computer plugs into your projector. There are a variety of hookups possible between the projector and the computer – VGA, HDMI, DVI, USB – so if you’re supplying your own laptop into this equation, check with your IT department to make sure you have a compatible connection.

Prepping P2V for projection

There may be a permanently installed computer or control console in your space that controls the room’s AV devices, like the ceiling-mounted projector, DVD player, etc. Or, you may be the one supplying the laptop to act as the interface between the projector and Point 2 View.

In any case, you’ll need to install the Point 2 View software onto the computer prior to projection. Just slip the CD into the drive and follow the directions. After a successful installation, plug the Point 2 View Camera into the computer via USB, and start up the software. Once you’ve got a real-time image on your computer screen, it’s time to tackle getting it to the projector.

Setting the video output to the projector is probably the trickiest part of your journey. If you’re using a dedicated computer console, it may be as easy as selecting “Projector” or “Auxiliary” on the AV interface of the console. But if you brought your own laptop, the steps to output to external video are largely dependent on operating system as well as model of laptop. These settings are similar to what you would need to output to a separate monitor. There could be a special function key on your keyboard that toggles the video output, or you may need to go through a few menus. Let’s quickly step through the basic operations needed for each major operating system:

Mac OS – setting up simultaneous displays is called mirroring. Plug in the external monitor, and open “System Preferences.” Then click “Display.” Set both displays to the same resolution. You can then click the “Arrangement” tab to click mirroring mode on or off. On MacBooks and some other Macs, mirroring mode can be toggled simply with the F7 key.

mac_display

Windows XP – many laptops and computers with Windows XP support multiple monitors with a feature called Dualview. Right-click the desktop, and click “Properties.” In the dialog box, click the “Settings” tab. Click the “Display” list, and you should see the Projector model listed as an alternate display option. Select the projector, then click the option to “Extend my Windows desktop onto this monitor.” Your desktop should now appear on the projector screen.

xp_display

Windows Vista – Windows Vista will often automatically detect the projector and default into mirroring mode, which mirrors the desktop. But if Windows can’t identify the monitor, you can use Windows Mobility Center (available on mobile PCs) to connect the display. Click the “Start” button, click “Control Panel,” click “Mobile PC,” and then click “Windows Mobility Center.” On the “External Display” tile, you can click “Connect display.” There will be a “New Display Detected” dialog box. Since the default is mirroring mode, which you want, simply press “OK” to connect the display.

vista_display

Windows 7 – Windows 7 makes things a little easier than its predecessors, generally speaking. Windows 7 will pop up a display dialog box when you plug in the projector, with the title “Change the appearance of your displays.” The second set of options from the bottom is called “Multiple displays,” and you can select “Duplicate these displays” to make the projector show your desktop.

7_display

NOTE: For many PCs with Windows operating systems, the FN+F5 keyboard shortcut is the way to toggle display modes. However, it can vary by manufacturer, and you may need to consult your user manual or manufacturer’s website for more information.

Once you’ve a) got the Point 2 View up and running and capturing an image, and b) the computer outputting to the projector (which is, in turn, projecting onto the screen), you’re almost there. You want to do two final things. First, set the optimal resolution of the Point 2 View. Generally, you’ll want to set it as high as the projector can handle; the Point 2 View’s highest resolution is 1600 x 1200. If you don’t know the maximum resolution your projector can handle, do some trial and error to see what looks best, which is easy enough. In the upper right-hand corner of the Point 2 View interface, you can change resolution through a simple pull-down menu.

The last step is to make your image full-screen, so your image is nice and large on the projection screen. This is easy, too, using the Point 2 View interface. On the left-hand side of the interface, there are three tabs that stick out. The bottom one reads “full screen.” Hit that tab to fill up the entire screen with the captured video. You can hit escape to exit full screen mode when you need to.

You’ve done it! You can now share your Point 2 View’s subject with the entire room on the big screen.

For your convenience, we’re going to repeat these steps in list form. The first list is for rooms that have their own dedicated console. The second list is for when you’re bringing a separate computer or laptop to the room.

Dedicated Console

  1. Power on the projector
  2. Power on the computer/control console
  3. Install the Point 2 View software from the included CD
  4. Plug in the Point 2 View via an available USB port
  5. Start the Point 2 View software. You should be getting the real-time capture on your computer screen
  6. Set the console to output to the projector, if it’s not already
  7. Set the optimal resolution of the Point 2 View. Resolution is located in the upper right-hand corner of the Point 2 View interface
  8. Go to full screen mode by clicking the bottom tab on the left-hand side of the Point 2 View interface

Separate Laptop

  1. Power on the projector
  2. Turn on your laptop
  3. Install the Point 2 View software from the included CD
  4. Plug in the Point 2 View via an available USB port
  5. Start the Point 2 View software. You should be getting the real-time capture on your computer screen
  6. Plug the projector cable into your laptop. This could be VGA, HDMI, or USB, depending on the projector and your laptop. Your IT department should be supplying this connection to the ceiling-mounted projector
  7. Configure your laptop to output to the external video source (that is to say, the projector). Consult your user’s manual
  8. Set the optimal resolution of the Point 2 View. Resolution is located in the upper right-hand corner of the Point 2 View interface
  9. Go to full screen mode by clicking the bottom tab on the left-hand side of the Point 2 View interface

* Prices are subject to change, please visit www.ipevo.com for the latest price infomation.
* Find more tips and stories about P2V at www.ipevo.com/p2v.

Point 2 View Super Tips: How Do I Shoot a Standard Sheet of Paper?

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Filed Under (Document Cameras in Business, APPLICATION, All Applications, All Products, P2V, P2V Tips) by ipevoblog on 2011-01-05

We’re sometimes asked about the best way to configure the Point 2 View USB Document Camera for one of the most common objects you might wish to capture: a standard sheet of paper. This is the A4, 8.5 x 11” (or 216 x 279 mm), “letter”-sized piece of paper. We’ll give you a couple of handy tips to make sure this task is a breeze for you.

First of all, while the Point 2 View has a remarkable amount of versatility with its multi-jointed stand, it’s not quite high enough to completely capture an entire sheet of paper, if that’s what you’re after. The Point 2 View mounted on the stand needs about a 6-inch boost to maintain the proper distance from the paper.

As it happens, our Tubular Wireless Speakers, when locked together in a tube, are the perfect height and circumference to provide a steady base for the Point 2 View to capture a sheet of paper. No, you don’t need to buy Tubular just to act as a stand! But if you happen to own Tubular—which is a terrific way to enhance audio for Bluetooth devices like the iPad, by the way—you’ve already got a compact accessory to give you the necessary boost.

Of course, there are many, many other objects around the office, classroom, or home that can give you an extra 6 inches: be creative! One of the handiest might be textbooks: four or so usually works great. Others options we’ve heard about are one of those 100-count containers of blank DVDs, and a drawer pulled from a desk.

Tubular/Textbooks bases

Actually, though, the Point 2 View basically comes with its own boost: the box itself! Set the Point 2 View package on its side, and you’ll have the 5 or 6 inches you need. That’s pretty easy, right?

P2V box

Once you have the height, you need to tackle orientation. The temptation is to put the camera body on the “default” center attachment and position the camera such that the base of the stand is sitting at the bottom of the piece of paper. Resist temptation! The Point 2 View was designed with not one, but three attachments on the tip of the stand for just this reason. Position the Point 2 View on a side attachment, not the center. This gives you the ability to place the stand at the side rather than the bottom of the piece of paper. This position will be much easier to capture the sheet from.

One last tip. Say you need to capture a detail from the paper, such as a particular passage, chart, or picture. Remember that you have two ways to get a closer look. You can physically reposition the Point 2 View—which is easy, given the stand’s several joints—or, you can use the zoom option, which is located in the upper left-hand corner of the camera interface on your computer screen. Anywhere from 1x to 3x zoom is possible.

P2V zoom option

* Prices are subject to change, please visit www.ipevo.com for the latest price infomation.
* Find more tips and stories about P2V at www.ipevo.com/p2v.