How to Project Teaching Material without a Computer

0

Filed Under (Document Cameras in Business, Point 2 View (P2V) USB Document Camera, VZ-1 VGA/USB Dual-Mode Document Camera, Ziggi-HD/Ziggi-HD Plus Document Cameras, All Applications, All Products, Staff Picks, Ziggi, Ziggi-HD) by tracy_ipevo on 2014-03-02

Need a way to project text and other content in the classroom or conference room without a computer? Here are three setups you can try that don’t require a computer.

1. Using Just a VGA/USB Document Camera

IPEVO_How_to_Project_Teaching_Material_without_a_Computer_01

What you’ll need:

Steps:

  1. Connect the VZ-1 HD to your VGA display device using a VGA cable.
  2. Plug in the power adapter for both VZ-1 HD and your VGA display device and turn them on.
  3. Use the Resolution Selector to find an optimal resolution if it did not automatically switched to one.

2. Using a Document Camera With an iPad and Apple TV

IPEVO_How_to_Project_Teaching_Material_without_a_Computer_02

What you’ll need:

Steps:

  1. Power on the WS-01 Wireless Station.
  2. Connect Ziggi-HD’s USB cable to the WS-01’s USB port. The WS-01 will power the camera.
    IPEVO_How_to_Project_Teaching_Material_without_a_Computer_09
  3. Connect the HDMI to VGA Converter to Apple TV using the Converter’s built-in HDMI connector.IPEVO_How_to_Project_Teaching_Material_without_a_Computer_08
  4. Connect your VGA display device to the Converter with a VGA cable.
  5. Click on “Settings” on your iPad and browse your available WiFi networks. Select the network with the phrase “IPEVO WS-01” in it. Now your iPad is connected to WS-01.
  6. Access the App Store on your iPad. Search for and download the free “IPEVO Whiteboard” app.
  7. Power up the Apple TV and your display device. Apple TV will help you find and connect to a wireless network. Select the network labeled with IPEVO WS-01. Now Apple TV is communicating with the WS-01.
  8. If using iOS 6 or earlier for iPad: Double tap the Home button on your iPad to bring up the Multitasking Bar. Swipe to move to the left of the Multitasking Bar, tap the Airplay button, and select Apple TV in the pop-up menu. Turn on the Mirror switch to enable Mirror mode. Content on iPad will now appear on Apple TV’s display device.
  9. If using iOS 7 for iPad: Swipe up from the bottom of the screen to access the Control Center. Tap the Airplay button. In the resulting screen, select your Apple TV and then turn the Mirroring switch on to enable Mirror mode. Content on iPad will now appear on Apple TV’s display device.
  10. Start IPEVO Whiteboard on your iPad. A live image from the document camera should now appear within Whiteboard, and thus on your monitor or projection screen.

IPEVO_How_to_Project_Teaching_Material_without_a_Computer_07

Real-time Annotation: With this setup, not only can you wirelessly stream live image capture from your document camera (like textbooks, handwriting, math equations, 3D objects, artwork, or anything else). You can also annotate the image capture using the simple drawing tools in Whiteboard. These annotations will appear on the monitor or television in real time, allowing you to place proper emphasis on your material with shapes, lines, text boxes and more.

3. Using an iPad and Apple TV

IPEVO_How_to_Project_Teaching_Material_without_a_Computer_04

What you’ll need:

Steps:

  1. Connect the HDMI to VGA Converter to Apple TV using the Converter’s built-in HDMI connector.
  2. Connect your VGA display device to the Converter with a VGA cable.IPEVO_How_to_Project_Teaching_Material_without_a_Computer_05
  3. Ensure iPad is connected to your existing WiFi network. Access the App Store on your iPad. Search for and download the free “IPEVO Whiteboard” app from the App Store.
  4. Power up the Apple TV and your display device. Apple TV will help you find and connect to a wireless network. Select the same existing WiFi network.
  5. If using iOS 6 or earlier for iPad: Double tap the Home button on your iPad to bring up the Multitasking Bar. Swipe to move to the left of the Multitasking Bar, tap the Airplay button, and select Apple TV in the pop-up menu. Turn on the Mirror switch to enable Mirror mode. Content on iPad will now appear on Apple TV’s display device.
  6. If using iOS 7 for iPad: Swipe up from the bottom of the screen to access the Control Center. Tap the Airplay button. In the resulting screen, select Apple TV and then turn the Mirroring switch on to enable Mirror mode. Content on iPad will now appear on Apple TV’s display device.
  7. Start IPEVO Whiteboard on your iPad. Tap the Camera icon near the top of the screen. Whiteboard will display real-time video from iPad’s built-in camera, which will be mirrored to your display device.


Real-time Annotation:
Like the first setup, you can use Whiteboard’s drawing toolkit to annotate on top of whatever’s being captured by the iPad’s camera. In Whiteboard, you can also choose to create a blank (white) board to draw on. Whatever you draw or capture will be displayed in real time on your VGA display device, whether it’s a monitor or a big-screen projection.

10 Great Classroom Activities Using iPad & Doc Cams

2

Filed Under (Document Cameras in Education, Point 2 View (P2V) USB Document Camera, Ziggi-HD/Ziggi-HD Plus Document Cameras, iZiggi-HD Wireless Document Camera, APPLICATION, All Products, WS-01, education) by ipevoblog on 2013-05-09

Pattern blocks

diagram

What Can Your Class Do with the Wireless Station? There are numerous options for teachers looking to invigorate their curriculum and get their students (re)engaged and inspired. Let’s take a look at what’s possible when you pair a document camera with multiple iPads.

For the uninitiated, doc cams capture printed documents and 3D objects. What you do with that video is where it starts to get interesting. Sure, you can project the image onto a large screen for teaching sessions, but what happens when you stream it to multiple iPads at the same time? Memorable, effective, and just plain fun activities, that’s what!

Here are ideas for some K-12 subjects to get your mind turning with all the possibilities:
Math
1. Word Problems: Position a word problem under the doc cam, and stream it to groups of students. Each group discusses and collaborates on the best way to solve the word problem. Groups then share and compare their answers. You can write out the best solution for everyone to see when each group has had a chance to share.

World problems

2. Pattern Blocks: A fun yet educational exercise for younger kids involves pattern blocks and tangrams. Show patterns with the doc cam. Groups must complete the patterns correctly with their blocks.

English
3. Fictionary: Why not have some word game fun as a reward or just as a break in between regular lessons? One of the most fun is Fictionary, which you can play in groups. Find an obscure word in the dictionary and write it under the doc cam. The groups must come up with definitions for that word. Write down each “fake” definition along with the real definition. The groups then have to guess which definition fits the word. Points are scored both for correct answers and for how many times groups guess your fake definition. It’s a lot of fun!

4. Picture Books: For the younger crowd, reading picture books to the class can really be enhanced when another copy of the book is placed under the doc cam. Students can follow along on several iPads mounted throughout the class. Kids will love being able to follow along and see the artwork as you read.

Picture books

Science
5. Dissection: Frog dissection is one of those iconic science class events. You can share your dissection with the class so they get a better understanding of how to conduct their own dissection (or when there aren’t enough specimens to go around). The same is true for labs and demonstrations of all kinds. Keep in mind there are a lot of great video tutorial apps for experiments and dissections.

Dissection

6. Electrical Circuits: Give groups the tools they need to make simple electrical circuits. Provide instructions and diagrams with your doc cam, and then have each group create their own circuit — to light a light bulb, for one example — using batteries, wire, circuit boards and switches.
History
7. Geography: Share blank maps with groups using the doc cam. Students must fill out the maps (country names, capital cities, names of rivers and other natural features, etc.). Share and compare the answers at the end. You can add a little competition to the mix with a “Geography Bee”-style elimination.

8. Mystery Object: Bring in one or more actual objects from the past — an arrowhead, a uniform patch from World War II, a newspaper article about a famous event — and stream it to everyone’s iPad so they get an up-close view. Ask students to guess the object’s period, function, importance, and more. This is a great visual lead-in to a lesson.

Mystery object

Art
9. Share Your Technique: Three to five iPads, when properly distributed, is the perfect amount to give smaller classes a “front row” view of your own artspace when you share brush techniques, drawing methods, collage construction, etc. A close-up tablet view can sometimes be better than a single large projection screen, particularly for fine detail work. Now everybody can see what you’re doing without physically crowding around.

Share your technique

10. Camera Tour: For lessons in digital photography, take students through a detailed walkthrough of the actual camera itself and all of its buttons, menus and functions. Students can learn by doing and follow the video stream of your camera tutorial with their own cameras.

To pull this setup off, consider pairing the iPads with two inexpensive products from IPEVO: the Ziggi-HD USB Document Camera and the WS-01 Wireless Station.The setup’s pretty straightforward, and with just one WS-01, you can stream 2 or 3 iPads simultaneously at 1600 x 1200 resolution, or up to 5 iPads at 1024 x 768 resolution (which is still very good).

The possibilities are endless, so “get your hands dirty” and give it a shot. Chances are you’ll develop a unique activity that works for you and your class.

Read the full article ›

25 Ways for Students to Use IPEVO Document Cameras

2

Filed Under (Document Cameras in Business, Point 2 View (P2V) USB Document Camera, VZ-1 VGA/USB Dual-Mode Document Camera, Ziggi-HD/Ziggi-HD Plus Document Cameras, APPLICATION, All Applications, PRODUCT) by ipevoblog on 2012-01-24

blog_p2v_ziggi_banner
IPEVO‘s Ziggi and Point 2 View USB document cameras offer teachers some great opportunities for interactive, multimedia learning in the classroom that can engage and excite students. And we have tons of ideas to share with educators.

But for now, let’s flip the script, turn the tables, put the shoe on the other foot, and take a look at Ziggi and Point 2 View from a student’s perspective. How can students — whether it’s elementary school, middle school, high school, or college — use document cameras to take their own learning to the next level?

We’ve brainstormed plenty of ideas, and maybe you can add some of your own.

So without further ado, here are 25 ways students can use Ziggi and/or Point 2 View document cameras in the classroom. (And parents, this will give you lots of ideas, too.) Plenty more ideas for educators will be on the way in future entries!

  1. Save math formulas — Use the one-touch snapshot feature and Review mode to capture useful formulas from your math textbook to save for later.
  2. Study with a friend — Have a remote study session with a classmate and share test materials, class notes, or textbooks. But no copying, and no cheating!
  3. Tutor time — Ziggi and Point 2 View make it possible to work with your teacher or tutor from anywhere.
  4. Show and tell — For younger students (and teachers, you can show them how), show and tell is taken up a notch when everyone can see details on the big projector screen. No more complaints that students can’t see.
  5. Better class notes — Enhance the notes you take in class by capturing small text passages, graphs, maps, data, or anything else from the textbook, and adding it to your notes.
  6. Book report —Take your book report from good to great by presenting a sample page from the book and reading it for the class so they can follow along.
  7. Play scene — Students acting out a scene from a play in class can display the scene in text form on the screen so the audience has two ways of understanding the play.
  8. Art appreciation — Collect a semester’s worth of your favorite images from an art textbook or photo book using the snapshot feature and Review mode.
  9. Diorama — Have you built a diorama? Give the class a close-up view of the diorama’s details.
  10. All-subject essay helper — Students in upper grades and college need to cite and quote sources, data, and other texts in their essays. Use the doc cam to display the info on screen for easy reference and copying.
  11. Help for the visually-impaired — Visually-impaired students can benefit from Ziggi and Point 2 View’s Macro mode and digital zooms for large, readable text.
  12. Science fair project — Lots of science experiment ideas could benefit from some real-time video or snapshots, whether you’re presenting for the class or testing your hypothesis.
  13. Help! — Stuck on a homework problem? Take a snapshot and email your teacher for help. Or, post the image to Facebook to get your classmates’ help.
  14. Multimedia presentations — Save images from the doc cam and use them in PowerPoint, Windows Movie Maker, iMovie, and more.
  15. Art class — Proud students can show off their latest painting, sketch, mixed media piece or sculpture for the whole class.
  16. Side by side copying — Need to type up text from a worksheet or textbook? Use the doc cam to project it onto your computer to save time.
  17. Web chats — Did you know both Ziggi and Point 2 View can be angled up and used like web cams? You never know when students will benefit from some face to face time.
  18. Restricted texts — Take a snapshot of text you might not be able to take with you, like books in the library, a friend’s class notes, or books reserved for classroom use only.
  19. Give your eyes a break — Hours of studying tiny text can result in eye strain and fatigue. Give yourself a break by displaying tiny text on the computer and zooming in.
  20. Quality, not quantity — Posters, graphs, and charts are often made so they are large enough for the class to see. By projecting these items for presentations, they don’t have to be so large, saving time and material.
  21. Add visuals to an oral presentation — Every student has to deliver an oral presentation. Give it some visual punch with accompanying images or text using the doc cam.
  22. English literature — Need to analyze a passage from a text you’re writing about? Use the doc cam to put the text side by side with your word processor doc on the screen.
  23. Nature “microscope” — Leaves, insects, dissections… you can learn more about anything complex and intricate by getting a closer view that’s still nice and sharp.
  24. Cram for the exam — Host a study session with several classmates, and display test materials, flash cards, sample questions, etc., onscreen so everyone can have a look and participate.
  25. Student becomes teacher — Use the doc cam as a presentational tool to teach other students how to solve math problems, construct something, or proofread a paper.

What ways can YOU think of for students to use Ziggi and Point 2 View? Let us know. And remember, many ideas for educators are on their way soon.

p2vziggi-hd-plus

The Lamb Cam – North Country School and Camp Treetops

2

Filed Under (Document Cameras in Education, All Applications, All Products, IPEVO, P2V Educators, PRODUCT) by ipevoblog on 2011-04-21

We know the Point 2 View USB Document Camera is versatile, but some stories from our customers still make us say, “Wow!” This is the case with Joel, the technology director at North Country School and Camp Treetops in Lake Placid, New York.

North Country School and Camp Treetops

The school (grades 4-9 boarding and day) and overnight summer camp (ages 7-14) have shared 200 beautiful acres, complete with working farm, since 1938. Students learn a traditional curriculum with hands-on projects and live in family-style housing. Children all year long participate in daily work jobs, a plethora of wilderness activities and extensive arts offerings. In springtime, lambs are born on site-yes, this really is a working farm! Joel had the idea to share this amazing event with alumni, parents, and the world through live image streaming on UStream. He conducted a thorough search, even buying a couple of $300 doc cams, before finally choosing IPEVO’s Point 2 View Camera, which became the school’s official “Lamb Cam” (love the name).

Joel shared his experience with other doc cams and his first impressions of the Point 2 View: “We started off with doc cams five or six times the price of the Point 2 View. These doc cams could work without a computer, but they were bulky and had nowhere near the versatility of the Point 2 View. IPEVO’s camera is much smaller and lighter than a conventional doc cam, so it was perfect to mount in the barn. Plus, it works effortlessly with Macs, which we use almost exclusively. At the price, I could give one to every one of our teachers and not put a dent in the budget.”

North Country School and Camp Treetops

Joel and Mike, the farm manager, mounted the camera vertically for maximum maneuverability, drilling through the Point 2 View’s base and attaching it to a beam in the barn. Our customers’ ingenuity never ceases to amaze us. Joel described how the Point 2 View passed a tough test with flying colors:

“We asked a lot from the Point 2 View: mounted in only a semi-heated area, capturing lambs from 30 feet away, and sending its signal through three six-foot USB extension cables. It performed great, and the image quality through the live stream is quite good. Other document cams wouldn’t have the depth of field capability of the Point 2 View, and web cams wouldn’t be able to achieve the kind of image quality we needed. I’ve used the Point 2 View for documents, 3D objects, and now as a Lamb Cam, and it’s just an easy, quality device to use.”

Joel added one more thing to emphasize that the Point 2 View can perform a variety of functions: “The farm manager lives in a building not far from the barn, and he has used the Point 2 View as a surveillance camera to help keep an eye on the farm animals.”

Whew, that’s one busy camera! Many thanks to Joel and North Country School and Camp Treetops for sharing their story. Visit their web site, and also consider checking out the Lamb Cam.

* Prices are subject to change, please visit www.ipevo.com for the latest price infomation.
* Find more tips and stories about P2V at www.ipevo.com/p2v.

Point 2 View Super Tips: Prepping for Projection

6

Filed Under (Document Cameras in Business, APPLICATION, All Applications, All Products, P2V, P2V Tips) by ipevoblog on 2011-01-24

This Super Tips entry is designed as a general guide to help you get the image from your Point 2 View USB Document Camera onto the projection screen. Unfortunately, given the huge amount of projector models, not to mention possible audiovisual configurations in your classroom or conference room, we’ll have to stay on a general level. Hopefully this guide will give you a good feel for what’s involved, and if you can’t quite get it working, you may need to tap your IT department or resident techie person for additional advice.

At its most basic, projecting onto a large screen takes three devices: computer or laptop (PC or Mac), the Point 2 View camera, and a projector. You can see the setup in the diagram below. The Point 2 View plugs into your computer via USB, and the computer plugs into your projector. There are a variety of hookups possible between the projector and the computer – VGA, HDMI, DVI, USB – so if you’re supplying your own laptop into this equation, check with your IT department to make sure you have a compatible connection.

Prepping P2V for projection

There may be a permanently installed computer or control console in your space that controls the room’s AV devices, like the ceiling-mounted projector, DVD player, etc. Or, you may be the one supplying the laptop to act as the interface between the projector and Point 2 View.

In any case, you’ll need to install the Point 2 View software onto the computer prior to projection. Just slip the CD into the drive and follow the directions. After a successful installation, plug the Point 2 View Camera into the computer via USB, and start up the software. Once you’ve got a real-time image on your computer screen, it’s time to tackle getting it to the projector.

Setting the video output to the projector is probably the trickiest part of your journey. If you’re using a dedicated computer console, it may be as easy as selecting “Projector” or “Auxiliary” on the AV interface of the console. But if you brought your own laptop, the steps to output to external video are largely dependent on operating system as well as model of laptop. These settings are similar to what you would need to output to a separate monitor. There could be a special function key on your keyboard that toggles the video output, or you may need to go through a few menus. Let’s quickly step through the basic operations needed for each major operating system:

Mac OS – setting up simultaneous displays is called mirroring. Plug in the external monitor, and open “System Preferences.” Then click “Display.” Set both displays to the same resolution. You can then click the “Arrangement” tab to click mirroring mode on or off. On MacBooks and some other Macs, mirroring mode can be toggled simply with the F7 key.

mac_display

Windows XP – many laptops and computers with Windows XP support multiple monitors with a feature called Dualview. Right-click the desktop, and click “Properties.” In the dialog box, click the “Settings” tab. Click the “Display” list, and you should see the Projector model listed as an alternate display option. Select the projector, then click the option to “Extend my Windows desktop onto this monitor.” Your desktop should now appear on the projector screen.

xp_display

Windows Vista – Windows Vista will often automatically detect the projector and default into mirroring mode, which mirrors the desktop. But if Windows can’t identify the monitor, you can use Windows Mobility Center (available on mobile PCs) to connect the display. Click the “Start” button, click “Control Panel,” click “Mobile PC,” and then click “Windows Mobility Center.” On the “External Display” tile, you can click “Connect display.” There will be a “New Display Detected” dialog box. Since the default is mirroring mode, which you want, simply press “OK” to connect the display.

vista_display

Windows 7 – Windows 7 makes things a little easier than its predecessors, generally speaking. Windows 7 will pop up a display dialog box when you plug in the projector, with the title “Change the appearance of your displays.” The second set of options from the bottom is called “Multiple displays,” and you can select “Duplicate these displays” to make the projector show your desktop.

7_display

NOTE: For many PCs with Windows operating systems, the FN+F5 keyboard shortcut is the way to toggle display modes. However, it can vary by manufacturer, and you may need to consult your user manual or manufacturer’s website for more information.

Once you’ve a) got the Point 2 View up and running and capturing an image, and b) the computer outputting to the projector (which is, in turn, projecting onto the screen), you’re almost there. You want to do two final things. First, set the optimal resolution of the Point 2 View. Generally, you’ll want to set it as high as the projector can handle; the Point 2 View’s highest resolution is 1600 x 1200. If you don’t know the maximum resolution your projector can handle, do some trial and error to see what looks best, which is easy enough. In the upper right-hand corner of the Point 2 View interface, you can change resolution through a simple pull-down menu.

The last step is to make your image full-screen, so your image is nice and large on the projection screen. This is easy, too, using the Point 2 View interface. On the left-hand side of the interface, there are three tabs that stick out. The bottom one reads “full screen.” Hit that tab to fill up the entire screen with the captured video. You can hit escape to exit full screen mode when you need to.

You’ve done it! You can now share your Point 2 View’s subject with the entire room on the big screen.

For your convenience, we’re going to repeat these steps in list form. The first list is for rooms that have their own dedicated console. The second list is for when you’re bringing a separate computer or laptop to the room.

Dedicated Console

  1. Power on the projector
  2. Power on the computer/control console
  3. Install the Point 2 View software from the included CD
  4. Plug in the Point 2 View via an available USB port
  5. Start the Point 2 View software. You should be getting the real-time capture on your computer screen
  6. Set the console to output to the projector, if it’s not already
  7. Set the optimal resolution of the Point 2 View. Resolution is located in the upper right-hand corner of the Point 2 View interface
  8. Go to full screen mode by clicking the bottom tab on the left-hand side of the Point 2 View interface

Separate Laptop

  1. Power on the projector
  2. Turn on your laptop
  3. Install the Point 2 View software from the included CD
  4. Plug in the Point 2 View via an available USB port
  5. Start the Point 2 View software. You should be getting the real-time capture on your computer screen
  6. Plug the projector cable into your laptop. This could be VGA, HDMI, or USB, depending on the projector and your laptop. Your IT department should be supplying this connection to the ceiling-mounted projector
  7. Configure your laptop to output to the external video source (that is to say, the projector). Consult your user’s manual
  8. Set the optimal resolution of the Point 2 View. Resolution is located in the upper right-hand corner of the Point 2 View interface
  9. Go to full screen mode by clicking the bottom tab on the left-hand side of the Point 2 View interface

* Prices are subject to change, please visit www.ipevo.com for the latest price infomation.
* Find more tips and stories about P2V at www.ipevo.com/p2v.

Where No Doc Cam Has Gone Before – The Point 2 View and Lutherie

0

Filed Under (Document Cameras in Business, All Applications, All Products, IPEVO, P2V Others, PRODUCT) by ipevoblog on 2011-01-14

Where No Doc Cam Has Gone Before

What’s a luthier? I didn’t know until we chatted with luthier (and satisfied IPEVO customer) Wesley Brandt! A luthier is a maker or repairer of stringed instruments, such as guitars. Wesley uses hand tools, traditional techniques, and fine woods to craft guitars, viols, and mandolins. Please check out his website, brandtguitars.com, for a window into this very interesting world.

Anyhow, Wesley has been using the Point 2 View USB Document Camera in a truly creative way we never could have expected. Often, the nature of Wesley’s repair work requires him to do intricate work inside the instrument itself. Luthiers usually employ mirrors—much like the mirror wand a dentist uses—to see their work inside the instrument. However, sometimes Wesley has to put his entire hand (if not arm!) inside the sound-hole of the guitar, and the mirror is just not able to be used. In these cases, the Point 2 View has been hired for the job.

Wesley explained how he is able to utilize the Point 2 View to help in these extremely tight spaces: “To position the camera, I use the laptop clip and mount a rare earth disc magnet on it, and then slip it inside the sound-hole. I then use another magnet outside the guitar (both protected with adhesive felt so they don’t damage the guitar). This setup holds the camera securely while also allowing me to aim it.”

Wesley supplied a picture of his handiwork taken with the Point 2 View, below. This picture shows the bottom inside of a guitar. As you can see, Wesley had to glue a piece of cloth over a damaged area he repaired in order to reinforce it. The slim, compact camera body was a perfect size to insert into the sound-hole to allow Wesley to view the area while working. And the included universal laptop clip also came in handy, which Wesley further innovated with strong magnets.

Taken by Wesley Brandt with Point 2 View

Taken by Wesley Brandt with Point 2 View

There is even more that Wesley has planned for the Point 2 View. He intends to mount a small mirror on the camera body so that he can view angles of up to 90 degrees.

“I never could have done as clean of work as I did without the Point 2 View camera,” added Wesley. “The Point 2 View’s macro mode allowed me to focus on extremely fine details within the guitar body. I think this method will be of great interest to my fellow luthiers.”

Thanks very much, Wesley. This is another great idea for the Point 2 View that was developed by one of our enterprising customers.

* Prices are subject to change, please visit www.ipevo.com for the latest price infomation.
* Find more tips and stories about P2V at www.ipevo.com/p2v.

Point 2 View Super Tips: How Do I Shoot a Standard Sheet of Paper?

9

Filed Under (Document Cameras in Business, APPLICATION, All Applications, All Products, P2V, P2V Tips) by ipevoblog on 2011-01-05

We’re sometimes asked about the best way to configure the Point 2 View USB Document Camera for one of the most common objects you might wish to capture: a standard sheet of paper. This is the A4, 8.5 x 11” (or 216 x 279 mm), “letter”-sized piece of paper. We’ll give you a couple of handy tips to make sure this task is a breeze for you.

First of all, while the Point 2 View has a remarkable amount of versatility with its multi-jointed stand, it’s not quite high enough to completely capture an entire sheet of paper, if that’s what you’re after. The Point 2 View mounted on the stand needs about a 6-inch boost to maintain the proper distance from the paper.

As it happens, our Tubular Wireless Speakers, when locked together in a tube, are the perfect height and circumference to provide a steady base for the Point 2 View to capture a sheet of paper. No, you don’t need to buy Tubular just to act as a stand! But if you happen to own Tubular—which is a terrific way to enhance audio for Bluetooth devices like the iPad, by the way—you’ve already got a compact accessory to give you the necessary boost.

Of course, there are many, many other objects around the office, classroom, or home that can give you an extra 6 inches: be creative! One of the handiest might be textbooks: four or so usually works great. Others options we’ve heard about are one of those 100-count containers of blank DVDs, and a drawer pulled from a desk.

Tubular/Textbooks bases

Actually, though, the Point 2 View basically comes with its own boost: the box itself! Set the Point 2 View package on its side, and you’ll have the 5 or 6 inches you need. That’s pretty easy, right?

P2V box

Once you have the height, you need to tackle orientation. The temptation is to put the camera body on the “default” center attachment and position the camera such that the base of the stand is sitting at the bottom of the piece of paper. Resist temptation! The Point 2 View was designed with not one, but three attachments on the tip of the stand for just this reason. Position the Point 2 View on a side attachment, not the center. This gives you the ability to place the stand at the side rather than the bottom of the piece of paper. This position will be much easier to capture the sheet from.

One last tip. Say you need to capture a detail from the paper, such as a particular passage, chart, or picture. Remember that you have two ways to get a closer look. You can physically reposition the Point 2 View—which is easy, given the stand’s several joints—or, you can use the zoom option, which is located in the upper left-hand corner of the camera interface on your computer screen. Anywhere from 1x to 3x zoom is possible.

P2V zoom option

* Prices are subject to change, please visit www.ipevo.com for the latest price infomation.
* Find more tips and stories about P2V at www.ipevo.com/p2v.

It All Adds Up: The Point 2 View Document Camera and Math Class

0

Filed Under (Document Cameras in Education, All Applications, All Products, IPEVO, P2V Educators, PRODUCT) by ipevoblog on 2010-12-16

Here’s a math problem: The Point 2 View camera, plus 4th grade math, multiplied by 21. Does that all equal success in the classroom? According to one teacher, yes indeed! We had a chance to check in with Terry Rex, a 4th grade teacher from Wings Park Elementary School in Oelwein, Iowa. He teaches 21 students in a self-contained classroom.

Point 2 View USB Document Cam

Earlier in the year, Terry was introduced to the Point 2 View at a math workshop, and he saw the potential for the camera to help students with math problems. Terry told us about the school’s decision:

“The extremely affordable price allowed us to purchase enough cameras to outfit all of our classrooms that wanted one. I think affordability is one of the camera’s biggest selling points.” The school ended up purchasing 21 cameras.

Terry explained how he uses the camera in class:

“I have used the camera multiple times to have students share their math work during our problem-solving activities. I have also used it to make YouTube videos of our class pets to put on our class website; I really like the ability to take snapshots. And early on, we purchased 15-foot USB extension cables, so the portability of the camera has been wonderful.”

To maximize visibility of the text and equations projected on screen in the dim classroom, Terry had a ready solution:

“We had some initial issues with lighting, but we solved them by setting a lamp next to our camera, so that when we turn off the lights, we can still clearly see the items under the camera.”

Terry also emphasized how easy the Point 2 View is to use, particularly for those who might otherwise find such technology to be bothersome or intimidating:

“Many of our tech-challenged teachers have expressed how easy it has been to use their camera. I know some of these teachers use the Point 2 View every single day. It’s perfect for large group sharing opportunities.”

A sincere thank you to Terry and everyone at Wings Park Elementary. It’s great to know the Point 2 View is making fractions, decimals, long division, units of measure, and all that other good stuff a little easier to learn!

To visit the Point 2 View USB Camera’s product page: www.ipevo.com/Point-2-View-USB-Camera

* Prices are subject to change, please visit www.ipevo.com for the latest price infomation.
* Find more tips and stories about P2V at www.ipevo.com/p2v.

Cell Phone Examinations — More ‘Evidence’ of the Point 2 View’s Versatility!

0

Filed Under (Document Cameras in Business, APPLICATION, All Applications, All Products, P2V, P2V Others) by ipevoblog on 2010-11-30

Point 2 View USB Document Cam

We are particularly pleased to bring you this story of another real-world application of IPEVO’s Point 2 View USB Document Camera. Recently, we had the opportunity to chat with Eric, a Police Surveillance Specialist with the Los Angeles Police Department. Eric found a use for the Point 2 View we could never have anticipated.

Among other duties, Eric is tasked with examining cell phones for use in ongoing investigations and court cases. In addition to taking closeup pictures of the phone itself, specialists must also examine and record information contained on the phone. While some cell phones have ways to send certain types of data to the computer, often specialists like Eric have to literally take pictures of the cell phone screen itself displaying texts or call histories or other information. And that’s where the Point 2 View comes in.

“There are a few products on the market that cell phone examiners are stuck with trying to capture these small, low-light screens,” said Eric. “I was introduced to the Point 2 View by a fellow examiner, and I’ve found the camera to be a great tool for the work I do, and a significant improvement over competing products.”

And what features of the Point 2 View impressed Eric?

“A dim screen in a semi-darkened room makes for a tough subject to photograph,” Eric explained. “The Point 2 View’s high resolution and good performance in low-light situations make it an ideal camera for this situation. I’ve been impressed with the functionality of the Point 2 View, particularly its ability to focus well and easily for clear pictures.”

It’s great to learn the Point 2 View is making a difference, however small, in something as important as law enforcement. Thanks for sharing your story, Eric! Who knows what other uses our savvy customers will find for the Point 2 View? Keep checking in to find out.

To visit the Point 2 View USB Camera’s product page: http://www.ipevo.com/Point-2-View-USB-Camera_p_70.html

* Prices are subject to change, please visit www.ipevo.com for the latest price infomation.
* Find more tips and stories about P2V at www.ipevo.com/p2v.

Mobile Learning Gets an Assist from the Point 2 View Camera

3

Filed Under (Document Cameras in Business, APPLICATION, All Applications, All Products, P2V, P2V Educators) by ipevoblog on 2010-08-17

Today we check in with Dr. Alisa Cooper, a Professor of English at Glendale Community College in Glendale, Arizona. She has a particular interest in the power of mobile learning. As she summarizes it,

“Mobile gadgets are everywhere, and just about every student has a mobile phone in his/her pocket. Why not take advantage of these learning tools?”

Normally, Dr. Cooper has access to conventional (and expensive!) document cameras in her classrooms. But recently, she had the opportunity to present a mobile learning workshop at the Sloan Consortium (Sloan-C) conference in San Jose, in order to teach other educators about creating and utilizing mobile content. For this event, she needed a portable document camera solution to present a range of mobile devices, from the iPhone and Droid to e-readers and the iPad. After reading about the Point 2 View USB Document Camera, she ordered one, and we’re happy to learn that Dr. Cooper is pleased with her purchase:

“My initial impressions were that the camera was just what I needed. It was small, yet sturdy, and the picture quality was great. I really didn’t think the quality would be so good. It was super easy to set up.”

Dr. Cooper also spoke about how she might use the Point 2 View going forward:

“I will use it when I travel and for web demos. I’m going to also try to use it for online conferences with students. I teach writing, so it might be good to mark up a paper in a live online conference session in DimDim [a web conferencing software]. The student could listen and watch me mark up the paper.”

Finally, we asked Dr. Cooper how the Point 2 View compares to the conventional document cameras in her classrooms. These bulky cameras can cost anywhere from $500 to several thousand dollars, versus just $69 for the Point 2 View. Here’s what she had to say:

“It wasn’t until we were in San Jose that I got to see a real comparison image, and I still think the image quality is just as good. What is so amazing is I didn’t feel the need to have a light. The document cameras in the classroom have these lights. Sometimes I have to use them even in the bright classroom. The Point 2 View didn’t even need a light.”

Sincere thanks to Dr. Alisa Cooper for sharing her thoughts. Take a look at the demo video she made with the Point 2 View. You can also check out Dr. Cooper’s mobile learning blog.

* Prices are subject to change, please visit www.ipevo.com for the latest price infomation.
* Find more tips and stories about P2V at www.ipevo.com/p2v.